RN Nursing Students’ Intent To Become Faculty: Results From A Qualitative Study

RN Nursing Students’ Intent To Become Faculty: Results From A Qualitative Study

The nursing faculty shortage is predicted to worsen as faculty reach retirement age. The shortage affects enrollment into nursing programs because of a lack of qualified faculty. Increasing the number of faculty available is critical to maintaining nurses needed to care for citizens. Using a qualitative descriptive approach, RN to BSN students were asked about intent to become faculty in their career. Eight RNs pursuing their BSN were interviewed. Five themes emerged: modeling the role: positive/negative, planting the seed, perceiving rather than knowing, seeing the lightbulb go on, and weighing the pros and cons. Nursing faculty can influence RN to BSN students’ intent to become faculty and can attract students to the role by conveying enthusiasm, collegiality, and maintaining clinical relevance.


Beth Cusatis Phillips, PhD, RN, CNE, CHSE

Dr. Beth Cusatis Phillips, PhD, RN, CNE, CHSE is the Strategic Nursing Advisor with ATI and Ascend Learning. Prior to ATI, Beth spent 16 years at Duke School of Nursing as Associate Professor and Director of the Institute for Educational Excellence. Beth taught in the ABSN and MSN programs. Beth spent 9 years at Vance Granville Community College where she taught in and directed the ADN/LPN programs.  Prior to that, Beth worked for 13 years at UNC Hospitals and Vidant Hospital.  Beth received her ADN from Waukesha County Technical Institute; her BSN from East Carolina University; her MSN from Duke; and her PhD from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. Beth’s educational/research/presentation interests include faculty orientation and development, professional identity in nursing, student decision making, and diversity, equity and inclusion.