Microinterventions for Microaggressions: Bystander Intervention in the Clinical Setting

Microinterventions for Microaggressions: Bystander Intervention in the Clinical Setting

Real conversations about race, gender, identity, and diversity are needed more than ever, but sometimes those candid conversations inevitably result in the same microaggressions that women, people of color, LGBT people, and other underrepresented individuals endure every day. These incidents are even more challenging in the clinical setting where maintaining the patient relationship is essential for effective care. How can we think about “microinterventions” that not only address what’s happening in the moment but proactively prevent future harm and create the kind of “just” culture that we want to see? This interactive workshop will introduce an evidence-based practice to respond to microaggressions during or after an incident while also working to prevent them before they occur.


Ada G. Gregory

Ada Gregory is the Associate Director of the Kenan Institute for Ethics (KIE) at Duke University, where she is responsible for developing programs and facilitating faculty involvement in projects across KIE’s portfolio. Kenan is a “think and do” tank committed to promoting moral reflection and commitment, conducting interdisciplinary research, and shaping policy and practice on ethical issues at and beyond the university. Currently KIE’s work focuses on global migration, human rights, environmental policy, technology, moral attitudes and decision-making, and religions and public life. Gregory also serves as the university’s student ombudsperson providing informal, confidential support for undergraduate, graduate and professional students. A known leader in equity, diversity and violence prevention, Gregory brings over twenty-five years of experience working in a variety of capacities designing, implementing, and evaluating training for judges, healthcare providers, faculty, police officers, 911 operators, attorneys, students and a variety of other professionals and lay people. As a former police officer, victim advocate, trainer, non-profit director, and campus administrator she brings hands-on experience working with diverse groups to develop a coordinated response to violence, harassment and other equity concerns in a variety of organizational settings. She has delivered numerous keynote addresses and presentations, facilitated workshops and trainings, and received several awards, including the 2002 National Peace Award in recognition of her efforts in the field of violence against women.