Future Directions for Interprofessional Education and Collaboration in the Health Sciences

Future Directions for Interprofessional Education and Collaboration in the Health Sciences

Increases in the cost and complexity of health care have increased the need for high functioning health care teams. Nursing education, including the current work of the American Association of Colleges of Nursing in revising the education essentials, has embraced the idea of common competency domains across all health care practice. In this session we will review the history of nurses’ involvement in interprofessional education and collaboration and discuss current models and future trends, as well as the importance of articulating the unique knowledge and skills of nursing and nurse identity. Discussion will emphasize best practices in nursing and interprofessional education as well as impediments to collaborative learning and practice. Participants will be asked to share their experiences and ideas.


Lisa J. Day, PhD RN CNE ANEF FAAN

Lisa Day, PhD, RN, CNE is Vice Dean for Educational Innovation and Clinical Professor at Washington State University College of Nursing. Dr. Day has been involved in academic and clinical practice education since 1999 and, since 2008, has consulted on several national nursing education-related projects including the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching’s National Study of Nursing Education and the first phase of the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation -funded project Quality and Safety Education in Nursing (QSEN). She is a co-author of the landmark publication Educating Nurses: A Call for Radical Transformation (Benner, Sutphen, Leonard & Day, 2010), which reports the results of the Carnegie study, and has provided many faculty development workshops and curriculum consultations for schools of nursing in the US and Canada. She is certified as a Nurse Educator (CNE) by the National League for Nursing (NLN) and was selected as a Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation Faculty Scholar in inter-professional health sciences education, 2013-15. Current projects include a study of a nursing education intervention focused on collaborative preparation of the direct-care nursing team in long-term care; and development of a course for health professions students in inter-professional values clarification. She recently co-authored with a communication scientist an innovative book on safe communication in nursing practice (Hannawa, Wendt & Day); is currently a member of the NLN Commission for Nursing Education Accreditation (CNEA) residency program accreditation task force, and the NLN Nursing Education Research Review Panel.