Faculty’s Role in Supporting Students: A Qualitative Perspective on Student Grit

Faculty’s Role in Supporting Students: A Qualitative Perspective on Student Grit

A question that challenges nursing program admission decision-making processes is predicting who will succeed. NLN funded two-year multi-methods study of students (N=451) in ADN programs (9 study sites) was conducted to explore grit as a predictor of success. This session takes a deep dive into the qualitative findings (N=16 interviews) where participants revealed the perceptions/expectations of their nursing program, and overall goals to become a nurse regardless of challenges or setbacks. These interviews yielded two themes along a continuum: 1) Success is about really wanting this (to be a nurse)- preparing, planning, and doing; 2) Success is about keeping going- adapting, pivoting, and doing. We will explore how faculty can support student success through the lens of grit.


Amber Young-Brice, PhD, RN, CNE

Amber Young-Brice, PhD, RN, CNE is an Assistant Professor in Nursing at Marquette University. Amber’s program of pedagogical research explores the relationship between the influence of non-cognitive factors, such as grit, and the successful trajectory of students. Additionally, she studies ways to foster these factors through theoretically derived and evidence-based pedagogical innovations. Her research is grounded in her expertise as an educator and underpinned by theories from nursing, education, and social sciences, as well as a passion for supporting all students. She’s the 2018 NLN Ruth Donnelly Corcoran Research Award recipient. Amber holds a master’s degree in nursing education and PhD in nursing, and is a certified nurse educator. She has taught at the undergraduate, graduate, and post-graduate levels over the past 13 years. In addition to her full-time teaching role, from 2015-2019, Amber did educational development for the university, performing individual and group consultations, discussions on best practices in higher education, and offered programs specifically for clinical and practicing faculty. She continues this role within her college of nursing working as a new faculty mentor and conducting programming for onboarding all new faculty. Additionally, Amber has experience in curriculum design and assessment, course development and coordination, classroom assessment techniques, reflecting on effectiveness of teaching, and contemplative pedagogy.